HarborOne Announces $75,000 in Grants

HarborOne Foundation recently announced $75,000 in grants to organizations in Rhode Island.

Said James Blake, CEO of HarborOne, “The work of these nonprofit organizations contributes greatly to the vibrancy and health of the local community. Investing in organizations that create educational opportunity, improve access to affordable housing and provide basic needs to our most vulnerable citizens aligns with the bank’s core values of service, community and trust.”

For more information, read interview in Providence Business News.

Centreville Bank Awards $180,000 in Grants

GCRI member Centreville Bank Charitable Foundation has awarded $181,900 in grants to eight Rhode Island organizations with missions ranging from social services to education to environmental protection.

Recipients included Child & Family Services in Middletown for the Bridges to Success Independent LIving Program; Friends Way for bereavement support and operational support; Comprehensive Community Action Program in Cranston to replace and enhance digital technology at three youth/skill centers; Sojourner House for rapid rehousing of victims of sexual abuse, assault and trafficking; San Miguel School for scholarships; ONE Neighborhood Builders for homeownership promotion and financial education; and Save the Bay for out of school programming.

Resources for Educational Equity

Thanks to those of you who were able to attend this morning’s session on Education Disparities.  It was a compelling conversation about equity in both education and philanthropy. 

If you would like to listen to the audio of the session, please contact Nancy at Nancy.wolanski@uwri.org. Panelists were Marcela Betancur, Latino Policy Institute; Elizabeth Burke Bryant, RI Kids Count; Karla Vigil, EduLeaders of Color; Nick Donahue, Nellie Mae Education Foundation.

  • If you would like a copy of the Latino Policy Institute report on education disparities, as well as some policies recommended by the Schott Foundation and the National Education Policy Center for ensuring that all children have the opportunity to learn, regardless of their background or which school they attend, or Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s new principles centering their work around racial equity, please contact Nancy at Nancy.wolanski@uwri.org.
  • The Schott Foundation in Boston, which has done a lot of work around racial equity in education, is offering a webinar this Thursday, April 11 at 2:00pm if you’d like to learn more about Culturally Responsive CurriculaLearn more
  • Some of the handouts Nick shared are:

Paid in Full by Dorian O. Burton and Brian C.B. Barnes

The Road to Achieving Equity by Kris Putnam-Walkerly and Elizabeth Russell

Paying Attention to White Culture and Privilege by Gita Gulati-Partee

Where White Privilege Came From by Allan G. Johnson

  • Look for more information soon about our May GCRI session on Collective Impact.  We will be working with the Federal Reserve and Working Cities Challenge on an engaging session about developing deeper partnerships and co-creating with community partners.

Mission Investors Exchange Mission Investing Institute Discount for GCRI Members

Mission Investing Institute

New York, March 26-28

The 2 ½ day training will be held at Ford Foundation’s Center for Social Justice on E 43rd Street, covering the essentials of impact investing.  The Institute is for staff of foundations or other philanthropic asset owners who are new to the field — whether they’re starting a program from scratch or joining an established program. If there are individuals in your network who could benefit from the Institute, we are happy to offer this referral discount and would be grateful if you could share the opportunity— you can find summary information at the end of this email, along with information on how to apply the discount.  GCRI members receive a $200 discount off the non-member rate. Registration for the Institute closes March 11th.  Visit here for more information and to register. Contact Nancy Wolanski for information on accessing discount.  Nancy.wolanski@uwri.org

Related Resources

Read this story from Tina Wahl, President of the Barra Foundation, who credits the 2016 Mission Investing Institute with giving her the tools that enabled her to steer the Barra Foundation towards their first mission-related investment.  Read this summary of themes and lessons learned from the 2017 Mission Investing Institute, in Troy Michigan.

Tufts Health Plan Foundation Announces 10 Momentum Grants in RI

Ten Rhode Island organizations each will receive a grant of $10,000 from Tufts Health Plan Foundation’s new Momentum Fund. The fund was established to foster new ideas and support cities and towns in their efforts to make their communities better places to grow up and grow old.

“We developed the Momentum Fund to help smaller communities and organizations that want to do this work,” said Nora Moreno Cargie, president of Tufts Health Plan Foundation and vice president of corporate citizenship at Tufts Health Plan. “They are adopting more inclusive policies, building accessible parks and public spaces, and integrating age-friendly practices.”

In addition to the 10 projects in Rhode Island, the Momentum Fund is supporting 10 projects in Massachusetts and 7 in New Hampshire. Each is community-led, addresses healthy aging and includes older people in the planning and implementation process.

“Many New England communities recognize older people as tremendous assets,” said Phillip González, the Foundation’s senior program officer. “This is an opportunity for us to learn from communities as they innovate and collaborate to address the needs of that community.”

The first Rhode Island recipients of the Momentum Fund grants are Benjamin Church Senior Center, Inc.,  Catholic Social Services of RI, Child and Family Services of Newport County, Cranston Senior Services, Educational Center for Arts and Sciences, PACE Organization of Rhode Island, Progreso Latino, Inc., Roger Williams University, The Providence Village of Rhode Island, and Westbay Community Action Program.

More information

Hasbro Employees Support Rhode Island Philharmonic Student Scholarships

The Providence Business News profiled a unique partnership between GCRI member Hasbro employees and music students at the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School.  Members of Hasbro’s Music Matters Employee Network teamed with the Philharmonic’s students for a benefit concert and raised $2,000 for scholarships for the program.

See full article

 

 

Standing in Sympathy and Solidarity

GCRI is committed to building a safe, equitable community, where all Rhode Islanders can grow and thrive.  There are always challenges to that work, but this week has brought heartwrenching news of political and racial violence and threats across the nation, that require us to renew our commitment to our work and to our community with even greater urgency.
We send our deepest sympathy to the Jewish community in Pittsburgh, which yesterday suffered the worst anti-Semitic violence in our nation’s history.  And we stand with the Jewish community here in Rhode Island, and all those who have been threatened or have been victims of hate and violence.
The Jewish Alliance of Greater Rhode Island, a member of GCRI, is hosting a Community Prayer and Action Vigil tomorrow — Monday, October 29 at 5:45pm — and we encourage you to attend to join in sympathy and solidarity with our neighbors and friends as they mourn the tragic events in Pittsburgh.  And we continue to stand together in unity against those who would cause harm and sow discord and hate.
Please visit Jewish Alliance’s Facebook page for more information.
GCRI’s sister organization, Grantmakers of Western Pennsylvania, has an update of the situation on their website, as well as opportunities to support the victims of this tragedy.

Puerto Ricans a Year After Hurricane Maria

A year after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, residents of the island are still struggling with the storm’s impact on their housing, finances, and mental and physical health, a survey by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and the Washington Post finds. Based on face-to-face interviews, the report, Views and Experiences of Puerto Ricans One Year After Hurricane Maria (37 pages, PDF), found that 83 percent of survey respondents had a home that was destroyed or significantly damaged, lost power for four or more months, had to drink water from a natural source, experienced a job loss, developed a health condition or had an existing one worsen, and/or received mental health services as a result of the storm.

Report

Merrimack Valley Relief Efforts

Merrimack Valley

Our thoughts are with our neighbors in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover as they struggle with the results of the recents gas explosions.

United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley has established a relief fund for those affected by the gas explosions in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover.

Essex County Community Foundation has also established a relief fund for victims in conjunction with the Massachusetts Governor’s office.

Hurricane Florence Relief

The effects of Hurricane Florence are still ongoing and our thoughts continue to be with those in the Forum family affected by this storm. Forum member, North Carolina Network of Grantmakers, is compiling information and resources related to the philanthropic response in the state. NCNG will continue to update the resource page as new information becomes available.

http://www.ncgrantmakers.org/Resources/Resources-for-Grantmakers-(1)

The Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) also has resources on its website, and will be doing a webinar this afternoon, September 18:

  1. The Center for Disaster Philanthropy has launched its 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season Fund. More information can be found here or if you wish to donate you can do so here.
  2. Tanya Gulliver-Garcia, Assistant Director of major initiatives gives an overview of disaster funding following disasters and offers advice for how philanthropists can effectively respond to all disasters, including hurricanes.
  3. CDP — with generous support from the UPS Foundation, and in close collaboration with the Southeast Council on Foundations, the Council on Foundations, and The Funders’ Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities — will be hosting a webinar on Tuesday, September 18 at 3 p.m. ET/2 p.m. CT to discuss Hurricane Florence’s impact and provide insight on how funders can support the recovery effort.

Lastly, CDP is keeping a profile of Hurricane Florence up to date on its website. Please check here daily for more information on the hurricane, as well as intel on critical needs and resources for how philanthropy can support the recovery effort.

United Way has a relief fund established as well.

If you have family, friends or coworkers who would like to do tangible supply assembly, VOAD makes use of United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR) Cleaning Kits, Hygiene Kits and School Kits.  Volunteers can gather, assemble and donate completed kits to UMCOR for this current Hurricane Florence effort and other future disaster relief efforts.

So please encourage anyone who is interested to follow the specific instructions for the assembly of these kits:  https://www.umcor.org/UMCOR/Relief-Supplies.  There are lists of required supplies, an instructional video, shipping label and packing list.

Rivers Keep Rising and More Deaths Are Feared as Florence Pushes Away

People are still being rescued, even as the remnants of Hurricane Florence move out of the Carolinas. At least 31 people have been killed. Record-breaking rain has pushed rivers over their banks, and water levels are unlikely to recede fully for days.

Read more in New York Times.

In Flood-Hit Public Housing, a Reminder That the Poor Bear Brunt of Storms’ Fury

This week, after a brief evacuation, Keisha Monk returned to Trent Court to find that flooding from Florence had turned her place into a sodden wreck. She also realized that she was now a player in the kind of redevelopment drama that tends to swamp storm-battered places like this — a story of race, class, gentrification and safety fears, and questions without easy answers about who gets to live on often alluring, sometimes treacherous, waterside real estate.

Read more in New York Times.

Florence Recovery Page on United Way Online

America’s Charities lists additional organizations working on relief efforts in the Carolinas:

  • Feed the Children delivering over 400,000 pounds of food and disaster supplies to community partners in vulnerable areas.
  • The Salvation Army National Capital Area has officers and staff on site in the Carolinas to assist families with food and spiritual care. Monetary donations allow for us to purchase and serve food and water to those in need.
  • Best Friends Animal Society is working with partner organization throughout the affected areas to identify shelters/rescue groups in need of help. We’ve already started supporting many with transporting animals out of the area, and will continue post-hurricane to ensure that as many animals as possible are moved to safety.

Feeding America is working with its network of local foodbanks to deploy and provide support, food and supplies to people in communities impacted by Hurricane Florence. For every dollar donated, the Feeding America network of food banks can secure and distribute at least 10 meals to those recovering from the storm.