HarborOne Announces $75,000 in Grants

HarborOne Foundation recently announced $75,000 in grants to organizations in Rhode Island.

Said James Blake, CEO of HarborOne, “The work of these nonprofit organizations contributes greatly to the vibrancy and health of the local community. Investing in organizations that create educational opportunity, improve access to affordable housing and provide basic needs to our most vulnerable citizens aligns with the bank’s core values of service, community and trust.”

For more information, read interview in Providence Business News.

Centreville Bank Awards $180,000 in Grants

GCRI member Centreville Bank Charitable Foundation has awarded $181,900 in grants to eight Rhode Island organizations with missions ranging from social services to education to environmental protection.

Recipients included Child & Family Services in Middletown for the Bridges to Success Independent LIving Program; Friends Way for bereavement support and operational support; Comprehensive Community Action Program in Cranston to replace and enhance digital technology at three youth/skill centers; Sojourner House for rapid rehousing of victims of sexual abuse, assault and trafficking; San Miguel School for scholarships; ONE Neighborhood Builders for homeownership promotion and financial education; and Save the Bay for out of school programming.

Tufts Health Plan Foundation Announces 10 Momentum Grants in RI

Ten Rhode Island organizations each will receive a grant of $10,000 from Tufts Health Plan Foundation’s new Momentum Fund. The fund was established to foster new ideas and support cities and towns in their efforts to make their communities better places to grow up and grow old.

“We developed the Momentum Fund to help smaller communities and organizations that want to do this work,” said Nora Moreno Cargie, president of Tufts Health Plan Foundation and vice president of corporate citizenship at Tufts Health Plan. “They are adopting more inclusive policies, building accessible parks and public spaces, and integrating age-friendly practices.”

In addition to the 10 projects in Rhode Island, the Momentum Fund is supporting 10 projects in Massachusetts and 7 in New Hampshire. Each is community-led, addresses healthy aging and includes older people in the planning and implementation process.

“Many New England communities recognize older people as tremendous assets,” said Phillip González, the Foundation’s senior program officer. “This is an opportunity for us to learn from communities as they innovate and collaborate to address the needs of that community.”

The first Rhode Island recipients of the Momentum Fund grants are Benjamin Church Senior Center, Inc.,  Catholic Social Services of RI, Child and Family Services of Newport County, Cranston Senior Services, Educational Center for Arts and Sciences, PACE Organization of Rhode Island, Progreso Latino, Inc., Roger Williams University, The Providence Village of Rhode Island, and Westbay Community Action Program.

More information

United Way Awards $100,000 in Affordable Housing Grants, Releases 2-1-1 Data Report, Invests in Olneyville

United Way Awarded $100,000 to five community organizations from the Housing for All Fund, established at United Way’s 2016 Housing for All Summit in 2016

The funded programs, by Foster Forward, Housing Network of Rhode Island, Rhode Island Center for Justice and West Elmwood Housing Development Corporation, focus on education, financial literacy, workforce and economic development and collaboration.

“We know that too many working families are housing cost-burdened, spending more than one-third of their income to keep a roof over their heads and face difficult choices among the basic needs they can afford,” said Anthony Maione, President and CEO, United Way of Rhode Island. “We also know there’s a lot of good work happening in our state to tackle this issue, which was evident in the proposals we received, and we are excited to see the progress of the programs we’re investing in.”

More information

2-1-1 Data Report Released

United Way also released its annual 2-1-1 data report, with analysis of the almost 200,000 calls for assistance 2-1-1 received in 2017.  The most common requests include financial assistance (rent, utilities, etc.), health information, food and housing.

Full report

UWRI Awards Olneyville Grants to 9 Local Organizations

Nine local organizations were the recipients of a shared total of $90,000 in grants from the United Way of Rhode Island’s Olneyville Community Fund in late June.

The 10-year-old fund, which was created when UWRI moved its headquarters to the Olneyville neighborhood of Providence in 2008, aims to support community-based organizations that benefit local residents and businesses.

Recipients include The Manton Avenue Project, Providence Housing Authority, Meeting Street ONE Neighborhood Builders, the Center for Resilience, Clinica Esperanza/Hope Clinic, Providence Community Library and Sojourner House.

Tufts Health Plan Foundation Awards $1.1 Million in Healthy Aging Policy and Practice Grants

Tufts Health Plan Foundation Awards $1.1 Million to Advance Policies and Practices Supporting Healthy Aging

Tufts Health Plan Foundation announced new community investments of more than $1.1 million, reflecting a commitment to advance inclusive policies that create thriving and vital communities that work for people of all ages.

“Communities have greater interest in age-friendly initiatives. There’s a growing understanding of the critical role older people play. They are an asset to community, and their voices and insights are invaluable to the public discourse on what communities need,” said Nora Moreno Cargie, vice president, corporate citizenship for Tufts Health Plan and president of its Foundation.

The Foundation’s new grants support initiatives to engage and train more advocates to participate in policy discussions; extend dementia-friendly programs to new communities; and address gaps limiting access to services and healthy, nutritious food. All are aligned with the Foundation’s focus on support for communities that work for everyone.

Three of the eight grants awarded went to Rhode Island organizations.  The Senior Agenda Coalition of Rhode Island was awarded a $50,000 policy and advocacy grant for a program to engage low-income seniors and develop them as community leaders with the capacity to effectively advocate for policy change.  Rhode Island College Foundation received a two year James A. Roosevelt, Jr. Leadership Fund (community engagement) grant for $252,400 to build a powerful community coalition to advocate, design innovative solutions and develop programs/services for an Age-Friendly Rhode Island.  The Alzheimer’s Association of Rhode Island also received a one year systems and best practices grant for $15,000 to support the update of Rhode Island’s five-year plan on Alzheimer’s and Related Disorders.

The new grants engage nearly 80 community organizations in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

LISC Advances Health Equity in Pawtucket/Central Falls

LISC Advances Health Equity in Pawtucket/Central Falls

LISC reports that tremendous strides have been made on the Pawtucket Central Falls Health Equity Zone (HEZ) initiative after just the first two years of a four-year commitment.

In its 2017 Report to the Community, Jeanne Cola, LISC Executive Director, says, “We are enormously proud of being able to provide leadership services and act as the backbone agency for this hard working collaboration of community leaders…. After just a year of executing the plan, we are already seeing the benefits to the community. We are making strides on expanding access to nutritious food and increasing levels of activity; we are developing programs to foster intergenerational relationships, diabetes education and management, and HEZ partners are focused on creating affordable  housing solutions.”

Read the 2017 HEZ Report

Interview on WPRO

Tufts Health Plan Foundation Recognized, Releases Annual Report Featuring Community Voices

Tufts Health Plan Recognized by Grantmakers in Aging, Releases Annual Report

Grantmakers in Aging Diversity Award

At its 35th anniversary annual conference, held in Boston, Grantmakers In Aging (GIA) presented the GIA Diversity Award for 2017 to the Tufts Health Plan Foundation.  The award was established to recognize organizations that embrace diversity as a fundamental element in all levels of their work in aging.

Therese Ellery, Senior Program Officer at the Rose Community Foundation in Denver, Colorado and a member of the GIA Diversity Award Committee, noted Tufts’ exemplary work, saying “Diversity and inclusion are embedded in all of the Tufts Health Plan Foundation’s grantmaking….A powerful example is the Age-Friendly Boston Initiative….The city recently released a 75- point Age-Friendly Boston Action Plan, which was informed by 30 listening sessions, conducted in 4 languages in 23 neighborhoods across the city. 70 organizations participated. In addition 3,700 surveys were completed in 6 languages. In sum, the City heard from 4,000+ older adults from every… single… community in Boston. In this and indeed all of its grantmaking, the Foundation seeks to minimize equity gaps in communities with limited resources and promote healthy aging for all residents. This means supporting work that engages LGBTQ older adults, communities of color, rural populations, and other traditionally underrepresented groups. ”  More information

Annual Report

This year Tufts Health Plan Foundation took a new approach to the annual report, sharing community voices to represent their work for 2016.  The audio annual report, Making Our Communities Great Places to Grow Up and Grow Old, highlights collaborations and initiatives supported by the Foundation to advance the age-friendly movement across the region.

“Listening is critical in our role as community partner and investor,” said Thomas O’Neill III, chair of the Foundation board of directors. “It informs how we engage, promote health and connect to the communities we serve.”

As part of its practice, the Foundation collaborates with and engages older adults, civic leaders and nonprofit organizations in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island to support communities that work for people of all ages.

“We are living longer, and opportunities to create vibrant cities and towns that are great places to grow up and grow old must be advanced,” said Nora Moreno Cargie, Foundation president and vice president, corporate citizenship at Tufts Health Plan. “Our annual report represents the voices of those we support.”

Included in the report are stories from Jewish Community Housing for the Elderly, the Latino Health Insurance Program, the Southern New Hampshire Planning Commission and Age-Friendly Boston.  The Foundation supports work that emphasizes collaboration, catalyzes change and honors community work. Last year the Foundation invested $2.9 million through 43 grants that engage 650 community groups across three states.  Listen

 

Disaster Relief Updates

Many GCRI members have stepped up with donations and support in the wake of multiple hurricanes, as well as the California wildfires and Mexican earthquake.  See some of their efforts

GCRI’s United Philanthropy Forum Partners are invested in various relief efforts as well:

PEAK Grantmaking Webinar

Working Together: Effective Funder Collaboration in Disaster Grantmaking, October 24

Through a national partnership with the Council on Foundations and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy this webinar will offer lessons learned and practical tools to maximize funder collaboration for effective disaster grantmaking. Participants will also get to hear about a successful funder collaboration.

California Wildfires

Forum member Northern California Grantmakers has a helpful resource page on responding to the ongoing wildfires in Northern California.

  • Forum member Grantmakers Concerned With Immigrants and Refugees, which along with NCG is located in Northern California, also has a helpful list of resources on responding to the wildfires – including a list of immigrant-serving organizations that are helping the local immigrant communities being impacted by the wildfires.

Puerto Rico — FORWARD Puerto Rico Fund / Fondo ADELANTE Puerto Rico

  • The Forum’s colleague organization in Puerto Rico, the Puerto Rico Funders Network (Red de Fundaciones de Puerto Rico) has just launched the FORWARD Puerto Rico Fund (Fondo ADELANTE Puerto Rico). The Fund supports key nonprofit institutions that are working to achieve a better Puerto Rico in the short-, medium- and long-term. Initially, FORWARD Puerto Rico will provide funds to organizations that are assisting communities affected by the devastating hurricanes Irma and Maria. Subsequently, it will target its support to strengthening these organizations and ensuring their resilience and continued contribution to Puerto Rico. The Fund will also support work on issues of government transparency, inequality, and community economic development. The Funders Network is comprised of longstanding and prestigious Puerto Rican foundations with extensive experience in strategic grantmaking and deep involvement in the nonprofit sector. The Funders Network will administer the Fund without charging administrative costs, and will distribute the funds to nonprofits with a proven track record in Puerto Rico.  The Fund is housed at the Foundation for Puerto Rico, which has a designation of 501c3 of the US tax code, and is thus domestic.

U.S. Virgin Islands

  • The U.S. Virgin Islands were devastated by Hurricanes Irma and Maria, but seem to have lost the attention of the media and the country. So a reminder that the CARE (Caribbean Assistance and Relief Effort) Fund has been established by the St. Croix Foundation for Community Development to address the basic needs of individuals and families directly impacted by the disaster, and to support the transition of hundreds of displaced students and families who are currently being (re)settled on St. Croix.

Center for Disaster Philanthropy Update

State of Disaster Philanthropy 2017 — CDP will be presenting a half-day convening on October 25 in New York, “From Hurricanes Sandy to Maria: Can Disaster Philanthropy Be More Strategic?”  On November 8, CDP and Foundation Center will be presenting a webinar on “Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy”  to discuss highlights from the 2017 report and data dashboard.

Recovery from the recent string of catastrophes is going to take billions of dollars and strategic cross-sector collaboration between funders, government, nonprofits, and humanitarian organizations. CDP has established four collaborative disaster funds to support long-term recovery challenges:

GCRI Members Support Relief Efforts

GCRI Members Support Relief Efforts

Tufts Health Plan Foundation

The Tufts Health Plan Foundation matched employees’ contributions to nonprofit organizations providing hurricane relief to communities affected by Hurricane Harvey and Irma.  150 Tufts Health Plan employees and board members donated nearly $23,000, and the Foundation match meant that $45,000 were given for relief efforts.  Hurricane Harvey donations were given to the American Red Cross, Massachusetts Chapter.  For Hurricane Irma, the donation was given to One America Appeal.    

Tufts Health Plan was also one of the first organizations to partner with the Massachusetts United for Puerto Rico effort, committing a minimum of $50,000 to this effort to help Puerto Rico, which was hit by both Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria.  The Tufts Health Plan Foundation will match two-to-one employee donations to nonprofit organizations providing relief in Puerto Rico.  The Foundation match will be directed to The Latino Legacy Fund at The Boston Foundation, which is partnering with the Alliance for Puerto Rico to support those who have seen their community devastated by the recent storms. Money raised through this fund will be distributed immediately for relief efforts and deployed during the next two years for reconstruction and economic recovery projects. Additionally, the fund will make grants to support resettlement efforts here in Massachusetts in response to the substantial migration of Puerto Ricans who are expected to arrive here in the months ahead.

Collette

Collette matched employee donations up to $5,000.  The company’s foundation is also making a donation of $10,000 to Save the Children for their efforts in support of Hurricane Harvey relief.  Save the Children provided supplies and resources to support children in shelters, and will be supporting organizations providing trauma support for children and families as they recover and rebuild.  They will also be providing funding and support to rebuild childcare facilities affected by the flooding.

Hasbro

Through its Play Relief program, Hasbro donated 15,000 toys and games to hurricane shelters and family support programs.  Employees volunteered to pack the kits.  Hasbro also donated $50,000 to the American Red Cross and matched employee donations up to $25,000.

Pawtucket Credit Union

Pawtucket Credit Union is matching employee donations to the American Red Cross Hurricane Relief Fund.

CVS Health

GCRI Member CVS Health has deployed emergency pharmacy resources and general assistance to the victims of Hurricane Harvey. A mobile pharmacy unit was set up outside the NRG Center in Houston, where evacuees were now able to pick up prescriptions, purchase over-the-counter medications and receive recommended vaccines.

CVS Pharmacy Deploys Additional Pharmacy Resources to Impacted Communities Following Hurricane Harvey. Mobile Pharmacy Unit Ready to Assist Patients at NRG Center in Houston.

Additionally, CVS Pharmacy, in cooperation with the Texas Department of State Health Services, will provide pharmacy services to Texas residents who have been displaced by the Hurricane through “pop up” pharmacies that are being deployed at emergency shelters in AustinDallas and San Antonio. “Pop up” pharmacies place pharmacists and pharmacy personnel at the shelters to counsel patients and facilitate the delivery of prescriptions from nearby pharmacies. These new actions follow a donation from the CVS Health Foundation announced earlier this week of $200,000 towards relief and recovery efforts, which includes $50,000 each to the Greater Houston Community Foundation and the American Red Cross, as well as $25,000 to Salvation Army, to aid the greater Houston area in supporting local residents as they begin the recovery and rebuilding process. The CVS Health Foundation will also match colleague donations up to $25,000.  In addition, CVS Health has donated more than $90,000 worth of in-kind products including personal hygiene, clean-up and over-the-counter items to area shelters and continues to work with shelters throughout Texas to support those displaced.

CVS also provided toiletry and hygiene donations to those displaced by the California wildfires.

Bank of America

GCRI Member Bank of America’s Hurricane Harvey Relief efforts have included sending mobile financial centers and mobile ATM’s to the region, and nearly $2 million in donations from the company, its foundation and its employees.  The company is matching employee donations through an internal program, and to date, bank employees have donated $457,000, matched dollar for dollar by the company for a total of $914,000. Those funds will be distributed to charities selected by the donating employees.  That amount is in addition to $1 million in relief funding provided by the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, with $250,000 directed through the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund and the remainder to be allocated as the company learns more about specific recovery needs.

“We are activating our resources to bring relief to the individuals, families, customers and communities that will continue to be impacted by the unprecedented challenges Harvey is creating across the region,” said Hong Ogle, Houston market president for Bank of America. “We are humbled and heartened by the outpouring of support.”

United Way Worldwide

  • United Way Worldwide has established multiple funds for relief and recovery efforts.  There is a United Way Worldwide Mexico Earthquake Recovery Fund, a United Way Irma Recovery Fund that also includes Hurricane Maria, and United Way Harvey Recovery Fund.  The Hurricane Harvey Fund began disbursing support in mid-September.  All three funds are accessible from unitedway.org/recovery.

 LISC

LISC has committed $100 million to Hurricane Harvey recovery work, both in Houston and in hard-hit rural counties in Texas and the Gulf Coast.  It will be working with new and existing partners and funders to expand this investment through grants, loans and equity assistance—especially in underinvested communities, where LISC has a long history.  More info

If you are a GCRI member, and have been active in supporting hurricane relief efforts in other ways, let us know!

Support for Hurricane Harvey Relief

Areas in Texas and Louisiana have experienced extreme flooding due to Hurricane Harvey, a record-breaking storm.  As always, philanthropy is stepping forward to assist those whose lives have been devastated by the flooding.  GCRI sister organizations in the region, as well as individual local foundations have established relief funds in the region, to assist in the long recovery and rebuilding process.

How to Help

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund
The Greater Houston Community Foundation
After receiving an overwhelming number of inquiries from citizens and companies who want to help, Mayor Sylvester Turner has established the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund that will accept tax deductible flood relief donations for victims that have been affected by the recent floods. The Greater Houston Community Foundation is administering the fund.

Hurricane Harvey Disaster Relief Fund
The Dallas Foundation
The Dallas Foundation has also established a fund that will support nonprofit organizations providing aid to Hurricane Harvey victims.

CDP Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund
Center for Disaster Philanthropy
In response to the needs that will arise following this devastating storm, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy has established the CDP Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund that will focus on medium and long-term rebuilding needs. We expect the long-term needs to be rebuilding homes, businesses, infrastructure, meeting the needs of young children, supporting mental health needs, and boosting damaged agricultural sectors.

Best Friends’ Relief Fund
This fund brings emergency assistance to animals in the wake of disasters. Donations to this fund are used exclusively to support lifesaving work wherever and whenever a catastrophe occurs.

NOLA Pay It Forward Fund: Hurrican Harvey
Greater New Orleans Foundation
Activated by the Mayor of New Orleans in partnership with the Greater New Orleans Foundation, the NOLA Pay It Forward Fund: Hurricane Harvey will provide resources for the early relief and rebuilding efforts of those communities impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

Hurricane Harvey Relief
GlobalGiving 
This fund will initially support first responders and survivors’ immediate needs, and also direct funds to local organizations to provide long-term support and build stronger response capacity.

Hurricane Harvey Community Relief Fund
Texas Organizing Project Education Fund
Rebuilding in areas impacted by Harvey will be most challenging for marginalized communities. Nearly a quarter of Houstonians live in poverty, approximately 550,000 people, and there are about 575,000 immigrants in the Houston metro area. TOP will work to ensure that Harvey’s most vulnerable victims have access to critical services from first response and basic needs to healthcare, housing and transportation.

Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund
AARP Foundation
Recognizing the immediate and longer-term challenges so many will face in the coming days, weeks, and months – especially people over age 50 who have been affected – AARP Foundation created a relief fund to support the victims devastated by Hurricane Harvey. To meet their needs, AARP and AARP Foundation will also match – dollar for dollar – contributions up to a total of $1 million. Working with the AARP state offices in the affected areas, we will direct 100 percent of all funds raised to organizations providing relief and recovery support to disaster victims.

Houston Chronicle: How to Help Victims of the Texas Storm
The Houston Chronicle
The Houston Chronicle offers a list of local, national and global organizations that are accepting donations to help the victims of Hurricane Harvey.

Philanthropy Southwest Texas Hurricane Relief Efforts
Philanthropy Southwest
Our member located in Texas has compiled a list of Hurricane Harvey relief efforts.

Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services Harvey Fund
t.e.ja.s
The Climate Justice Alliance asks that you donate to t.e.ja.s., the oldest environmental justice organization in Houston.

Texas Tribune: How to Get (and Offer) Help After Hurricane Harvey
Texas Tribune
The Texas Tribune has compiled a comprehensive list of resources on how to help with Hurricane Harvey relief and recovery, including where to make charitable donations.

Programming to Learn More

After Hurricane Harvey: Specific Challenges Facing Immigrants and Refugees
Following Hurricane Harvey, the immediate needs of Houston’s immigrant residents are generally no different from other displaced residents; however, they also face particular circumstances that can prevent them from accssing assistance and that impair their ability to rebuild their lives and communities. Join Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees, Philanthropy Southwest, and Center for Disaster Philanthropy for a webinar on September 18 to learn about unique post-hurrican challenges facing immigrants and refugees, particularly those who are low-income and limited English proficient. RSVP and watch the webinar at the link above.

Hurricane Harvey Recovery: How Donors Can Help
In response to significant flooding in Texas and potentially parts of Louisiana, the Council on Foundations and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy hosted a webinar on August 29 on how to allocate resources—human, financial and technical—to meet the needs of Hurricane Harvey-affected communities. Watch the webinar recording at the link above.

Additional Resources

Creating Order From Chaos: Roles for Philanthropy in Disaster Planning and Response
The Jessie Ball duPont Fund published this guide in 2015 to outline the best roles for funders in a disaster, culled from its many decades of experience in responding to the needs of communities and nonprofits beset by disasters, human and natural alike.

Disaster Philanthropy Playbook
A compilation of philanthropic strategies, best practices and lessons learned that helps communities think through how a disaster will affect them and plan and prepare to respond when it happens. It is centered on 15 strategies, including community and economic recovery; education; health and behavioral health; aging and disabled populations; arts and culture; environment; and others. The Disaster Philanthropy Playbook is a joint project of Center for Disaster Philanthropy and Council of New Jersey Grantmakers in association with United Philanthropy Forum.

Disaster, Older Adults and Philanthropy
This article from Grantmakers in Aging details why disaster-related death rates are so much higher older adults and how philanthropy can help.

Disaster Planning and Recovery for Nonprofits, Charities, and Libraries
The Resilient Organization, developed with the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, is a holistic guide to IT disaster planning and recovery. This e-book is intended for organizations that are preparing for a disaster, as well as those that need to rebuild and maintain operations after a disaster.

Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy: Data to Drive Decisions
The Center for Disaster Philanthropy has partnered with Foundation Center on an interactive dashboard, which provides an analysis of disaster-related funding by foundations, governments, corporations and individuals. The data presented illuminates funding trends, exposes some of the imbalances in where and when contributions are made to help donors make more strategic decisions about their investments in the full life cycle of disasters, including preparedness and recovery efforts.